Get fine-print savvy. Some websites will say you won an Xbox360 or a new laptop, for example, but if you look carefully, you’ll usually find an asterisk near the "you won" part. Be especially wary of weasel words, like "you may have already won," or "new laptop is based on a purchase of gummy bears worth $5,000 or more." Don't fall into these sorts of traps; they're ridiculously difficult and not worth it.
We've tested hundreds of sites where you can take paid surveys for money and we've found that Swagbucks by far is our #1 pick. They've been around for years and have a solid track record of paying their users. Plus, we also like that they offer opportunities to get paid for doing things other than surveys, like signing up for offers or shopping in their portal.
Read the Privacy Policy. It is usually found at the bottom of a site’s homepage. This is important: who will your information be shared with? Always look for a statement along the lines of: “Email addresses given to our company will never be sold, given away, or shared with any third parties without your consent.” When you read those, think to yourself if there's anything in the language that would let them sell their mailing list.
If you're looking to make money by completing surveys online – this site will not be very helpful for you.  Like the previous sites, they will take, retain, and sell your information to anyone that waves a dollar in their faces.  UNLIKE previous sites reviewed, they hide their consent for that information.  It's buried.  So not only do you make silly reward points that don't translate to cash but every third party service and product solicitor has your personal information.
This is where it can all go downhill quickly.  In the pressure to make as many pennies out of a nickel, a lot of research corporations will not just sell your answers but the data associated with it.  Details that you provide when taking paid surveys such as your name, address, age range can all be attached together quickly to fulfill a lot of larger companies' requests for information (RFI).

A little late getting into this discussion. But my favorite so far is OneOpinion. I think it’s mentioned here. Survey Junkie cool. MyPoints is okay. Ipso, not so much. I did make 300 points today in about 6 hours and every single survey except one I was disqualified for. I was disqualified for the two pointers as well as the higher pointed ones. I’ve never had that problem. Yes you get disqualified, but not everyone out of 30 or so. One of them I actually made to the 98% and was disqualified. I think they didn’t like the fact I was female, except that was answered at the beginning. 

If you're looking to make money by completing surveys online – this site will not be very helpful for you.  Like the previous sites, they will take, retain, and sell your information to anyone that waves a dollar in their faces.  UNLIKE previous sites reviewed, they hide their consent for that information.  It's buried.  So not only do you make silly reward points that don't translate to cash but every third party service and product solicitor has your personal information.

They include sites that seem to be their competitors because they earn referral fees when you buy memberships. A couple mentioned in scam forums even try to dupe you into buying the same list at other membership sites they own under different names. Naturally, these sites also have an incentive to exaggerate how much you'll earn from online paid surveys.
In the middle of all of this is a new breed of research corporation that relies on you – the survey taker – to determine this information.  For your time?  Many survey companies will pay you to take surveys for money or for other cash alternatives like gift cards or physical prizes and rewards. It depends upon the company as to whether they'll offer money or other offers and special deals.
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